Sandra and Woo… and science!

Sandra and Woo has caught the attention of the scientific world; it seems like every second “Proceedings of …” article series features a reference to our little comic! … Well, not really ;), but there are now indeed four scientific articles dealing with Sandra and Woo!

The first two articles, in German, were written by linguist Jun.-Prof. Dr. Ulrike Preußer from the University of Duisburg-Essen. Unfortunately, I can’t link them here since they were published in commercial magazines and are not available online. In her articles, she takes an in-depth look at the German versions of our strips #1 A Sly Raccoon and #17 The Forbidden Fruit and how comics can be used by teachers to generate literary interest in grade schoolers. The second article “Das war ein Schock, das mit der Schlange!” about The Forbidden Fruit features several reactions of third and fourth graders after reading the strip. Only one boy, Marius, immediately got the reference to Adam and Eve. Sandro was totally shocked by Woo’s behavior! ;)

  • Ulrike Preußer: “Literarisches Lernen am Comic – Zur Visualisierung literarischer Verfahren”, kjl&m forschung.schule.bibliothek, 3/2013, kopaed verlagsgmbh, München.
  • Ulrike Preußer: “Das war ein Schock, das mit der Schlange!”, Grundschulunterricht Deutsch, 2/2014, Oldenbourg Schulbuchverlag, München, pp. 16–22.

The other two articles, in English, were written by the computer scientists Philip Buchanan, Bachelor of Engineering at the University of Canterbury, Michael Doggett, Associate Professor at Lund University, and Ramakrishnan Mukundan, Associate Professor at the University of Canterbury. In their articles, they use artwork from Sandra and Woo to present a new automatic algorithm for extracting properties of an individual artist’s style and applying those properties to other drawings.


Interview with our reader Thomas G.

Here is a new interview about Sandra and Woo with one of the Sandra and Woo fans that received a poster package, our reader

Thomas G.

Can you please introduce yourself to our readers?

> Somewhat of an old geek that earns his keep by implementing stuff I either find useful or is wanted by people that I can’t fight off.

When you read Sandra and Woo for the first time, what grabbed your attention the most?

> When I first stumbled about the site in the early days, my strongest reaction was “YES!!! SOMEONE FINALLY EAT THAT OBNOXIOUS TWEETY!!!!!”

Is the thing you mentioned above still your favorite part of the comic, or do you like something else the most now?

> Well, there are of course some ups and downs, but I think I like the “mix” the most. Lots of different moods and themes.

Who is your favorite character and why?

> Larissa, because she can’t be fooled by ayone or anything.

Do you have a favorite story arc and/or a favorite single strip?

> The Tweety story arc of course. ;-)

You have read Sandra and Woo for many years now. Do you think the comic has changed in any way since the beginning?

> Yes it has. A lot of comics are somewhat “static” over the years, but Sandra and Woo seems to try different things over time.

Sandra and Woo is sometimes criticized for lacking focus. Is there an aspect of the comic that you’d rather get rid of?

> Personally I like the shorter one-strip gags or shorter 2-3 strip story arcs better than the longer ones.

Is there a topic you’d like to see getting addressed in a longer story arc?

> n/a

What are your wishes for the future of Sandra and Woo?

> That it continues to thrive of course.

Is there any other webcomic which you’d like to recommend to our readers?

> Not anymore unfortunately. http://ars.userfriendly.org/ was really great for many, many years, but now is in “re-runs” because of personal reasons. But worth to check them out if you don’t know them yet.

Do you have anything else do say? Here’s room for it:

> Many thanks again for the posters, and for a lot of laughs (and evil chuckles) over the years.


Interview with our reader MAT

Here is a new interview about Sandra and Woo with one of the Sandra and Woo fans that received a poster package, our reader

MAT

Can you please introduce yourself to our readers?

> Hello, I’m MAT, and if you don’t believe that I’m 37 years old, I won’t blame you. I even don’t believe it myself. I’m into science, roleplaying games, My Little Pony and overall “internet culture” (including webcomics, obviously). I’m a weirdo, I know it, and I’m proud of it.

When you read Sandra and Woo for the first time, what grabbed your attention the most?

> The similarities to Calvin and Hobbes, of which I’m a great fan.

Is the thing you mentioned above still your favorite part of the comic, or do you like something else the most now?

> The similarities to Calvin and Hobbes captured me, but Sandra and Woo definitely developed into something of its own. As a mere example, Sandra and Woo is way more successful in developing background characters.

Who is your favorite character and why?

> It’s hard to favor a single one of the characters, but I find Larisa particularly interesting, because she’s… no, she’s not crazy. She’s just herself – which is often seen as crazy in this world. Otherwise, “ninja mom” Ye Thuza is a great carrier of unexpected humor.

Do you have a favorite story arc and/or a favorite single strip?

> I’d rather say, some story arcs which are particularly memorable. At first, I’d think of the storyline about Larisa’s diabetes starting with her insulin injection in school. That one developed hilariously!

You have read Sandra and Woo for many years now. Do you think the comic has changed in any way since the beginning?

> It has. Of course. It broadened its focus, gave different characters their opportunity to shine, develop and present themselves, and touched a lot of unexpected subjects.

Sandra and Woo is sometimes criticized for lacking focus. Is there an aspect of the comic that you’d rather get rid of?

> Granting the spotlight to others than the title characters is not a bad aspect in my eyes. Go ahead! The touching of several serious and “less humorous” subjects baffled me at first, but it didn’t deter me. Quite the contrary, I’ve begun to respect the courage with which the comic handles such “unpopular” topics.

Is there a topic you’d like to see getting addressed in a longer story arc?

> Hm, I don’t know… maybe about the discrepancy of gender equality by law and in reality. A topic which I dealt with myself for a while quite intensively. In general, uncovering social biases is something that interests me.

What are your wishes for the future of Sandra and Woo?

> Go on and evolve!

Is there any other webcomic which you’d like to recommend to our readers?

> There are several webcomics I read, though most are targeted towards fantasy fans and roleplaying gamers, like Order of the Stick, Yet Another Fantasy Gamer Comic, Looking for Group, Dork Tower, Weregeek, and Friendship is Dragons.

Do you have anything else do say? Here’s room for it:

> If you ever notice someone around the web who calls himself “DM’s Choice” (spelling may vary), that’s probably me! Hello to everyone who encounters me :)


Interview with our reader R.J.R

Here is a new interview about Sandra and Woo with one of the Sandra and Woo fans that received a poster package, our reader

R.J.R

Can you please introduce yourself to our readers?

> My name is Roger and I’m 19 years old. I’m an overly energetic freak for comics and computers. I guess this already says most things about me you would have to know.

When you read Sandra and Woo for the first time, what grabbed your attention the most?

> I liked the concept of the speaking animal, that’s doing trouble everywhere it goes.

Is the thing you mentioned above still your favorite part of the comic, or do you like something else the most now?

> It still makes me want to read this comic every time there’s a new page.

Who is your favorite character and why?

> My favorite character is Shadow. He’s always that calm and polite. I think that makes him very special in the comic.

Do you have a favorite story arc and/or a favorite single strip?

> I like almost every arc, but my favorite was the one where they went to find the treasure.

You have read Sandra and Woo for many years now. Do you think the comic has changed in any way since the beginning?

> Of course it has changed. The best part showing that is how the relationship between Sandra and Cloud is going on, but I really like it that there’s a strict line between all those story arcs.

Sandra and Woo is sometimes criticized for lacking focus. Is there an aspect of the comic that you’d rather get rid of?

> Don’t even dare to change something.

Is there a topic you’d like to see getting addressed in a longer story arc?

> Sometimes I’d like to see a little bit more about the background story of Clouds mother.

What are your wishes for the future of Sandra and Woo?

> I wish it not to end soon.

Is there any other webcomic which you’d like to recommend to our readers?

> There are many good webcomics on the internet, everyone has to search for what they like.

Do you have anything else do say? Here’s room for it:

> I just want to say thanks for everything!


Interview with our reader AmbiValent

Here is a new interview about Sandra and Woo with one of the Sandra and Woo fans that received a poster package, our reader

AmbiValent

Can you please introduce yourself to our readers?

> I’m a middle-aged German software developer who likes fantasy, SF, webcomics and animation (both Japanese and other). I’m also following astronomy and politics news.

When you read Sandra and Woo for the first time, what grabbed your attention the most?

> Probably the differences between Sandra, Woo and Richard, yet there was harmony.

Is the thing you mentioned above still your favorite part of the comic, or do you like something else the most now?

> I’m following the relationships between many characters now, and usually find them interesting.

Who is your favorite character and why?

> Sandra. Maybe because she has a dark side, but is usually nice because she likes it.

Do you have a favorite story arc and/or a favorite single strip?

> The abandoned factory arc and the “love sux” strips around #100 (which I like most among them)

You have read Sandra and Woo for many years now. Do you think the comic has changed in any way since the beginning?

> (waves rolling) (whale song) Yes.

Sandra and Woo is sometimes criticized for lacking focus. Is there an aspect of the comic that you’d rather get rid of?

> I guess I’d dislike strips in which the characters lose their individuality and become mere puppets stating the author’s opinion. (Even if it were my opinion as well.) But I’m not even sure that Sandra and Woo was the webcomic where I saw that happen, and it was rare anyway.

Is there a topic you’d like to see getting addressed in a longer story arc?

> This is surprisingly hard to answer since I like the comic’s actions-have-consequences/no-return-to-status-quo-ness. Maybe Sandra and Woo going on a (gaming) campaign with the Williams?

What are your wishes for the future of Sandra and Woo?

> More interesting developments and character growth.

Is there any other webcomic which you’d like to recommend to our readers?

> City of Reality. Oh, it’s on hiatus. The Meek? Too. Hero In Training? No news. But Galaxion should return any day now.

Do you have anything else do say? Here’s room for it:

> I’d like to say a lot, but I think this is the wrong place for it.