art

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pepsi 500
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art

Post by pepsi 500 » 04 May 2009, 03:24

can you learn to be a great artist, or do you simply get born a good artist and it all comes naturally?
oh yeah, and are there any good sites for sharing art apart from deviantart? most of the people on there get on my nerves....
because they simply dont realise that seeing ^_^ =^_^= :3 over and over again isnt 'kawaii'
if i met the guy who invented emotes, i'd beat the hell outta him...
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powree
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Re: art

Post by powree » 04 May 2009, 13:18

I honestly think art has to be learned. I'm quite sure most artists will agree with me on the matter, since talent only speeds things up. Even the current great artists learned from someone.

Art sharing? Cgtalk,gfxartists, CgHub etc? Artwanted? Deviantart is the only place I know to have a lot of features when sharing artwork... It's rather too crowded though...

Furaffinity is a nice place for furry artists...
pepsi 500
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Re: art

Post by pepsi 500 » 04 May 2009, 22:34

thanks, i'll check them out
if i met the guy who invented emotes, i'd beat the hell outta him...
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Novil
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Re: art

Post by Novil » 22 Jul 2009, 00:23

Whatever it is, if it’s your goal to become “really” good in it, it’s always a mix of talent and hard work. Of course there are professions in which talent is much more important (singer) than in others (guitar player).

Concerning art, natural talent seems to be particularly important regarding the time an artist needs for a picture of a given quality. I think that I could draw a single Sandra and Woo strip in the same quality as Powree. But it would take an insane amount of time.

I like DeviantArt, but if you want some real profound critique of your work there’s probably no better place than ConceptArt.org.
Sandra and Woo | Sandra und Woo auf Deutsch
Gaia | Gaia auf Deutsch

"Don't be someone who they forget!"
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Rabid_Fox
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Re: art

Post by Rabid_Fox » 22 Jul 2009, 18:51

At the end of the day, nothing beats a bit of elbow grease. I was categorically told that I had no musical talent whatsoever and that I'd never play an instrument but now I play a number of instruments (at a mediocre level, admittedly, I do lack talent but not damned determination).

With art, I don't think any dedicated artist can't pull out scruffy, scratty pieces they drew a few years previous that they'd be embarrassed to put their signature on. Even if you're starting from scratch, keep scratching.
Oh my.
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Ninja Skunk
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Art art art

Post by Ninja Skunk » 06 Aug 2009, 03:12

Think of it this way: How do we differentiate great artists from a sub-par artists? The quality of the art they make. There has never been a case of a baby being born alongside a fully painted canvas, so it would technically be impossible to be born an artist at all, let alone a great artist.

Still, though, it's not hard work, either. Some people seem to "catch on" faster than others. They quickly master the subtle details and fickle nuances that separate the experienced artists from the immature artists. Apt Artists can learn in months the same skills an inept hobbyist would take years to acquire.

Okay, quick question: What was the key word in that last paragraph, the one that really sums up the advantage the so-called "natural artist" has?

Learn. They learn faster than others. From my personal experience, any person's talent has absolutely nothing to do with how many paintings they've made, or how many hours have been spent in a studio. Everything has to do with how well they learn; whether it be from peers, teachers, books or their own mistakes.

So, the only real kind of artistic "aptitude" is, when an artist makes a bad drawing he or she doesn't like, what do they do with it? Is it thrown away without a second thought and haphazardly redrawn, hoping it will appear better next time, or is the picture analyzed to discover what really made the picture so bad?

If you think about it, it is what is done with the bad works, not the good works, that distinguishes who has true talent, and that doesn't go just for art.

So, to sum it all up: Yes, being an artist has to be learned, but you have to make sure that you are learning, and not just repeating yourself. Repeating yourself is like a dog chasing its tail.

Oh, and Art Portfolio sites? You could try both Sheezyart.com and ArtBistro.com. I'm not sure I'd recommend either one, though. You'll find all the same problems from DeviantART on Sheezyart, and ArtBistro seems to be more oriented towards fine-art amateurs trying to make the jump to professionalism.
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